Monday, January 05, 2009

Colonial Projects: Learn From Your Classmates


Now that you have completed your Colonial Project, you have a chance to see what your fellow classmates worked on for the last two weeks before winter break. Spend at least fifteen minutes, and read ONE of the newspapers created by students in Mr. Nekrosius's class. Then, below, view ONE of the documentary videos created by Ms. Doyle's class. After viewing one video and reading one newspaper, on Ms. Doyle's blog, post at least three things, in sentence format, that you learned from the newspaper and three things you learned from the video. In addition, write one question for each of the two projects you viewed. Your question may be about the creative process or about the actual content of the project.

Be sure to note which class period's projects you are writing about in your blog post

Include your first name only in your post. Your post is due on Thursday!

Look here for the Salem Newspapers and see the videos on Ms. Doyle's blog.

43 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

I learned that that people thought that everyone could possibly be a witch.I thought that this was interesting: they thought that people were witches if they had red marks, and if poked with a needle, would not bleed. I also learned that people used to think that if their crops were few and make people sick, that they had been cursed by the devil. Many girls were orphaned because they were abandoned by their family. The girls would be adopted by extended, or other families. The girls would be treated like servants and the families would not love and support them as they would to a biological daughter. Orphaned girls, would probably not be married and have to work for the rest of their lives unless they did something to make themselves more popular.

My question is on: "Were Abigail Williams and Elizabeth Parris telling the truth about the witches or was it all a game?" Why didn't parents treat them as their own children? Didn't they agree to adopt them?

Ms. Doyle 8-9
Maddie

4:53 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Anne Huchinson per 8/9
Salem With Trials newspaper 3/4

There are many things that I learned from looking at just one of the movies made by a class based on Anne Huchinson. Three main things I learned were that Anne Huchinson had an amzingly strong belief in her god, and that she was so deturmained to prove her point that she would do anything to get to her goal. Another thing that stood out to me in this video was the fact that John Winthrop was surprised to see a less powerful person stand up against him to speak out their own thoughts; also he was against all the thoughts that Anne Huchinson had spoken out to the public about. The last fact that I learned about in watching this video was that Anne Huchinson had been banished several times from the Plymouth Colony.
When I read the Purifier, I learned quite a bit. Some things I learned were that spectral evidence (a method that was used in Salem as evidence whether or not someone was a witch) was mostly effective in Salem. Another piece of information I learned was that witchcraft had been practiced and punished in ancient Europe long before the Salem witch trials. The last fact that I found out was that the bible helped to influence the Salem witch trials hysteria by saying that "thou shalt not suffer a witch to live," making the people of Salem start to get uneasy when they "saw" a witch. (This all lead to the killings of many innocent people)
My first question is what kind of a family was Anne Huchinson born into? (Mean, very religious, free willed, ect.) My second question is why did the judges get so caught up in the witch hysteria? It is kind of a child's imagination playing tricks on themself right?
~Cameron Doyle 8/9

5:52 PM  
Blogger sam said...

I watched Period 8-9 documentery. I learned that Anne Hutchinson had a lot of kids and that was considered a good thing. I also learned that Anne Hutchinson's husband thought that she was a threat to the colony. Anne Hutchinson did not think that the minister's sermons were wrong. She just thought that their sermons were being misunderstood. Did you have an idea of how the movie should look or did you just do the individual parts and then put them together with no plan?


I read the Purifier period 3-4
I learned that the Puritans were nervous about many things before the witches came into play. The Puritans were worried about Indians attacking and about having enough food because of the English-French war. I also learned that there is a real disease called SLEEP PARALYSIS that causes people to have fits like the girls did. Finally, I learned that some Puritans belived that dogs could carry out the devil's deeds. Was anyone proven innocent?

Sam-1

6:35 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Korbin 8-9


Video per. 3-4

Many wars between Natives and Puritans over their own personal beliefs. The John Winthrop went to Cambridge. Blasphemy was a crime in Plymouth. Anne Hutchinson got a lot of Ministers to bow out from testifying against her because they wouldn’t swear to tell the truth, it was the last thing they wanted to do.
How did you find all of the materials for your costumes?
Newspaper The WitchWatch

Elizabeth and Abigail actions spread to several people through out the colony. There is a chance that a lot of the people in the colony acted weirdly because of a fungus that could’ve been in their wheat. Children had as much of a say in trials as adults did.
How did Children get to have an equal say as their parents?

7:18 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I read "The Witch Watch" newspaper (Per 8/9). In this newspaper there is a lot to learn and I thought it looked really great. I learned that the two girls who started the accusations were only ages 9 and 11. I also learned that in the trials, the accused were tested for "witch marks" like bruises or bumps or birth marks. I thought this was very unfair. I also read an article about John Proctor and learned that he tried to change the trial process before he was put to death. From reading this newspaper, I began to wonder why if women in this society were so unimportant why did the men listen to the accusations of two little girls?

Maria2
p.3/4

7:35 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Ms. Doyle's class
period 3-4
Frank Waggoner
Documentary of the trial of Anne Hutchinson period 8-9
I learned that Roger Williams was suportive of Anne Hetchinson and was more tolerent of Wakeres. I also learned that many people were on Anne Huthchinsons side and believed what she thought was true, but many of them were afraid to admit it to anyone. I also learned that Anne Hutchinson's minister was responsible for her banishment from the Plimith Colony. Was Anne Hutchinsons trial diferent then the other trials?
Salem With Trials Newspaper period 8-9
I learned that if someone is accused of being a witch then they are immediately arested and thrown in jail. I also learned that many children there died at a very young age. Why did the children die at a young age? I also learned that only todlers are aloud to play, after that you had to work. I also learned that ergot fungus in the crops growing in salem could have had an efect on the trials by making people see things that they really didn't see.
-Frank

7:50 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I am writing about the period 8-9 video documentary.

From the video I learned that unlike most relationships the one that Anne Hutchinson had with her husband was fair and her husband didn’t necessarily treat her as property. Another I learned from the video was that Anne Hutchinson openly criticized the ministers. I thought that she criticized them in meetings and such but never really to the public. Another thing that I learned is that Winthrop moved the trial to Boston to make it more difficult for Anne Hutchinson. I thought that he did it to make it easier for himself. A question I have is how Winthrop lived his life. Not just his part in the trials.

I am writing about the period 8-9 newspapers.

From the newspaper I learned that they arrested the four-year-old daughter of Sarah Good. I didn’t know that Sarah Good had a daughter, nor did I know that they would treat such a young person like that, even if they confessed to being a witch. Another thing I learned was that some puritans objected to torturing the accused witches because the confession would be false and under pain. People against the torture also thought that it was a European and very popish thing to do. People for torture thought that the accused should give confessions, and that they must have confessions by any means possible. Another thing I learned about is the “witch cake” method of determining whether or not that person is a witch. My question is how they programmed the HTML to make it fade in. Just in case that is not a valid question, i have another, did the puritans use any other types of torture?

marwan
doyle
period 8-9

7:56 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think Per. 3-4's video was very good. I learned that John Winthrop went to Cambridge. Also I learned that John Winthrop led a group of Puritans to the New World, all by himself. And lastly I learned that John Winthrop wanted to vanish Anne Hutchinson from the New World, and Anne Hutchinson was accused of disturbing the peace, slandering important people of the community and she was accused of holding private meetings.


How long was Anne Hutchinson in prison?


Per. 3-4’s newspaper was very well put together (Per.8-9 layout was better though). I learned that the Massachusetts Bay Colony was controlled by men, and was a male dominated society. Also I learned that Witchcraft had been practiced and punished in ancient Europe long before the Salem Witch Trials. And lastly I learned that the war against Witches officially ended on June 17, 1782.

Why were people hung on Gallows Hill?

Miles Reynolds
Per. 8-9
Mrs. Doyle

9:47 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Women and witchcraft:
some of the things that i learned from reading the article was. One i learned that if women didn't marry,have babies,or not even do house work people that they were strange and were working for the devil. Another thing is that people believed that women had the power to create fire, storms,plague,sickness or death. Lastly I learned that people would think that on certain nights the witches would come to worship Satan and they would create their evil deeds. They also said that the Jews worshiped the devil too.
My question is that: Why did they think that the Jews worship the devil?
Kimmi
Doyle 3-4

1:38 PM  
Anonymous Jack-1 said...

I learned that Anne Hutchison was banished from Plymouth colony several times for being a Quaker. I also learned that no one listened to Anne in her trail because she was a women, and women didn't have much speaking rights. Lastly, learned that Anne's marriage was one where the women was treated like a person, not chattel.

Why did Anne come back to Plymouth after she got banished?

Jack 1
Doyle
Per. 3-4

1:46 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The 6-8 Video
I learned from the movie that Anne was popular and non-popular to alot of people and the movie was well put together and entertaining.

The 6-8 Newspaper
The Newspaper was very well put together
and I learned alot about Tituba that I did not know and over all a good resource for information.

4:38 PM  
Blogger Loren said...

Loren (\/)
(O.o)<----- bunny!!!

witch watch,
I learned that children could accuse other ppl of being witches (of both genders and all ages) that there's a fungus called Ergot(totally spelled wrong but what ever, aye?)fungus that caused nero-problems. i also read the "God's rejects" article, it was mainly about the stuff we learned all-ready.

Movies 8-9 period,
Um.... wow they were interesting and out there... In a good way. didn't learn much but as was expected.... there was a lot of bloopers I'm assuming that means there was not enough to put in or is it that people really wanted bloopers. it was funny but i think you should have put ALL the movies first and then the bloopers, that's just an opinion though so ya........... bye *waves*

5:14 PM  
Anonymous Sam 0 said...

P. 3-4 Movie

1. I learned the defenses that Anne Hutchinson used, involved requiring a sworn testimony. Which weeded out some ministers.
2. I learned that some people regretted her banishment and eventual death.
3. Finally, I learned that she was charged with “holding private meetings”.

How was the movie organized? It seemed a bit random.

P. 3-4 Newspaper

People who were tried were guilty until proven innocent, rather then the modern day procedure of innocent until proven guilty.
Samuel Paris could have started the witch craze and influenced the girls.
That even doctors who were supposed to be scientific men, thought people could be infected by the devil.

Was any accused “witch”’s life spared who plead not-guilty.

Doyle 8-9
Sam 0

5:23 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Newspaper period 3/4:
I learned that Mary Easty was a religious puritan. She was accused of witch craft two times. The first time she was released and the second time she was hung.I also learned that women living in most societys were "expected to be seen but not heard". The husbands owned them and the women were treated without any rights.Also Once Abigail Williams and Elizabeth Parris accused a man in Andaner of being a witch, and when he wanted then arrested for slander, the girls didn't accuse anyone else and left town.
Question: Where Abigail and Elizabeth telling the truth?

Documentary period 8/9
I learned that People came from all around to hear Anne Hutchinson at her meetings and that not only men but women came to the meetings. Also, there were around 80 people at them. I also learned that the Anne Hutchinson trial was in the october of 1637. Mary Dyer met Anne Hutchinson aon october 17th in 1637 when Anne Hutcinson was helping Mary deliver her yet dead baby.
Question: How long after Mary Dyer's trial was her hanging and death?

Rachel
period 3/4
Doyle

5:33 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I thought that the online newspaper called Witch Watch that was done by the last period class was very cool. I learned that there are many ways to find out if someone was a witch, and they included finding a “witch’s marking” that doesn’t bleed or get pain in it when it is pierced. Other procedures include “Swimming Witch” and “Witch Cake.” I also learned that a young cild by the name of Dorcas Good was locked up in prison for being accused of a witch, this turned her appearance completely sad. She was accused of being a witch for having the devil’s mark on her which was probably just a bug bite. After her confession, she unfortunately had no family left, not even her mother who was sent to the gallows shortly after her release. There was also torture. One very common torture was when your head was tied to your ankles. But a harsher torture, to the death, was performed on Giles Corey after he did not confess to being a wizard. He was crushed by heavy rocks, he died soon after a few were placed on his chest.
I have also seen the movie from the last period class. It was just as interesting as the newspaper. I learned that Anne Hutchinson not only held weekly meetings where she told of her religious beliefs but also influenced people and made them believe that they had an inner light with which they could communicate to god. Some people really liked these meetings but others were very opposed to them and the fact that she was giving her beliefs of god. I also learned that some women and men treated equally not all the time, and for some people never. Lastly John Winthroap also had a great role of the puritans, and became under this influence during his time in collage.
Again both the paper and video were very fun and as well educating.

Rex
Period 3/4

5:38 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

When I read "Witch Watch" I learned that if a person floats, then he or she is a judged as a witch. I also learned that a tick bite on the baby of Sarah Good was judged as a witch, because they thought it was a devils mark. finally I learned that Women were considered Goddesses if they had healing powers. one question i would ask is if there are anymore types of trials in foreign places for witchcraft.
When I watched the 8-9 movie about Anne Hutchinson i learned that Anne Hutchinson had a lot of children,John Winthrop thought that the church of England was corrupt, and that having more than 10 children was average back then. I would ask the question: What originally drove her to believe what she believed?
Gregory 3-4
Ms. Doyle

5:41 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Having been in a Salem Witch Trials newspaper myself and having read many articles written by my classmates, I thought it would be rather difficult to find three more things I learned. However, in the 8-9's newspaper The Witch Watch, I found an article on the corn fungus–something I had wondered about, and of which no one in my class had researched or written about. The article was very interesting and informative. The rye that the Salem villagers could have been affected by a fungus, which I learned was called Claviceps Purpurea. While the fungus is growing, it has an ergot stage which can be harmful to any who eat it because some poisonous alkaloids develop. Ergot poisoning can cause nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, headaches, "pins and needles", itchy/burning feelings on the skin, spasms, convulsions, unconsciousness, hallucinations, psychosis, absence of peripheral feelings, swelling, blisters, and dry gangrene. If consumed for a long enough time, ergot poisonous could be fatal. As for my question, I found myself wondering how they had gotten the page you're on to fade out when you click a link, and then the next page to fade in.

I watched the 3-4 Video Documentary on Anne Hutchinson. I learned that a man named John Cottons supported Anne Hutchinson with her ideas on God. I learned that John Winthrop to Cambridge. I also learned that Anne Hutchinson was accused of three things: disturbing the peace, slandering important people in the community-most importantly slandering religious ministers, and, finally holding private meetings. While I was watching the interview of the Turban Twin Sisters, something occurred to me. If the Turban Twin Sisters could tell the future, wouldn't that have been considered a sin and they would have gone on trial anyway, whether or not they agreed with Anne Hutchinson?

Julia
Ms. Doyle 3-4

5:47 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Amos
Ms. Doyle
8/9

I read the 8/9 newsaper and movie and I learned that Anne Hutchenson's trial was very unfair. I also learned that she had 14 chuldren and that she had many folowers. My question is was she tortured. From the news paper I learned that women were more likly to be accused than men and that John Proctor did not confess. I also learned about rebbeca nurse. My question is why wasn't the court active right away.

5:58 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Amos
Ms. Doyle
8/9

I read the 8/9 newsaper and movie and I learned that Anne Hutchenson's trial was very unfair. I also learned that she had 14 chuldren and that she had many folowers. My question is was she tortured. From the news paper I learned that women were more likly to be accused than men and that John Proctor did not confess. I also learned about rebbeca nurse. My question is why wasn't the court active right away.

5:58 PM  
Anonymous Alex said...

I read The Purifier from the Period 3-4 class. I learned that the English-French Wars, most notably King William's War, were very important to the fallacy of the Trials. I also learned that Anne Putnam Jr., a major player in the accusations of witches in the Salem Witch Trials, apologized for her actions and was the only accusing girl to stay in Salem. Finally, I learned that people believed that walking through something natural, like a hole in a tree or a rock (including one tree in Salem Village that was used until 1793), can "cure" you. I would like to know why those related to suspected "witches" were suspected as well.

I watched Period 3-4's Anne Hutchinson video documentary. I leaned that Anne Hutchinson got many ministers to bow out of her trials by making them swear under oath, as it was against the word of God to lie under oath. I also learned that Hutchinson then tried to make it a religious trial by claiming that she heard the word of God speak to her. Finally, I learned that both judges and the jury voted in tese trials. I would like to know how the gunshot sounds were put into the movie towards the end.

Alex
Doyle 8-9

6:25 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"Accusations in the Salem Witch Trials" Newspaper 3/4

I thought it was interesting the the two popular judges just happened to be upper class. Another thing I thought was interesting was how none of the judges did not have any biases against the accused, but the townspeople swayed the judges to rid the so called witches so the judges would seem like they were actually doing something.The third thing that I thought was interesting was how if you confessed that you were a witch, you could possibly live (of course with penalties, like all your things and your land being taken away). I thought it would be just the opposite: if you confessed to being a witch, you would be hung without a doubt. I noticed on the front page it mentioned that something like the witch trials (basically where people will start to question each other and kill one another) will maybe repeat itself in history. Do you actually think it will?

Period 8-9 Documentary of the Trial of Anne Hutchinson

I didn't know that the governor actually picked a jury that didn't believe Anne Hutchinson. I also didn't know that the governor changed locations of the trial to make it harder for Anne Hutchinson. I didn't think that the trial was rigged that much. Another thing that I didn't know was that the governor stopped the trial. Here's a question for the first video segment: where did you get that jazz music? :D

Julian, 3/4

6:51 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Louie - Period 8/9 - Ms. Doyle

On The Purifier (3/4) Newspaper:
I learned a few things by reading this article. Giles Corey never confessed to being a witch. He remained silent at his trial and refused to answer any questions. This was because he did not want his land to be taken over by the government. Giles Corey was the first to have the truth "pressed" out of him. Large, heavy stones were placed on a board on his body as a method of torture. I also learned that Gallows Hill was on one of the heights points in Salem so that everyone could see it. This was where people who were considered witches were hung.

Question:
Why were witches who did not confess let free?

On 3/4 Period Anne Hutchinson Video:
The Turban Twin Sisters agreed with Anne Hutchinson's ideas, they believed in her idea of heaven but tried to keep their beliefs as a secret. John Winthrop found that Anne Hutchinson's ideas were foolish. He did not like how people were listening to her, especially because she was a woman. Anne Hutchinson was accused of more than one thing. She was accused of disturbing everyones thoughts and causing distress, making up things about religious ministers, and holding her own secret meetings. She also claimed that the bible was listening to her and it was on her side.

Question:
What did you make your costumes with? Did you bring in your old clothes or create you own costumes?

6:51 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Anne Hutchinson: per. 8/9

From the movie, I learned that Anne Hutchinson's religious beliefs were popular and interesting in their society. Many people would go listen to her and they would start to be convinced by her speeches and her beliefs. Many people believed she was right, but were afraid to admit it. She helped people understand the Bible in different ways. Also, she was also looked down upon. A lot of people in the community didn't like her religious beliefs and thought that Anne Hutchinson was mad.

Salem Witch Trials: per. 3/4

From the Salem Witch Trials newspaper, I learned that many people were apprehensive about the trials, and many innocent people were killed. It was all because of two girls and their servant. Also, I learned that the trials got more and more out of hand, people who were good Puritans and were respected, were accused of being witches, like Rebecca Nurse. Not only until later were men accused. In the beginning, it was only women, which I think has to do with their status. Women were not respected and they had no say in anything.

My questions:
1. Why did two men believe two girls? I thought women were unimportant.
2. Was Anne Hutchinson a highly respected woman in the society?

Jen
Doyle 8/9

6:53 PM  
Blogger Ellen said...

I read pd. 3-4 Salem Witch Trials newsletter. (by Hannah, Portia, and Alex)
I learned That 120 people were killed and 2 dogs during the Salem Witch Trials. I also learned the Salem Witch Trial hysteria began in February of 1692, and finally I learned that people were very worried about what god thought of them. The tiniest mistake would send them to the underworld, they had to be perfect. My question is how did they kill the people they accused of being witches? did they just hang them or did they do other things?

period 8-9 documentary of the trial of anne hutchinson
Most puritans believed that the natives should give up their land for them and convert to christianity, because of this there were many wars. Anne Hutchinson believed the natives should have their own rights. puritans relied on the bible for everything. My question were many people fortune tellers- or did they make up that aspect?

-Ellen

6:58 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

John Winthrop was against all of Anne Hutchinson's thoughts and beliefs. She spent a lot of time with Roger Williams because he was more tolerant of Quakers and their beliefs. Anne Hutchinson was accused of disturbing the peace of the community. Swearing in communal times was considered a great felony. Anne Hutchinson did not try to persuade the court into believing her side of the story. She tried to make them say "I swear..." which most of the ministers would refuse to do.
Why didn't Anne Hutchinson write anything for herself to read during the services?

Maddie
Ms. Doyle 8-9
Movie 3-4

7:35 PM  
Anonymous Stacy said...

Anne Hutchinson period 8/9

Two things that stood out to me are about Anne Hutchinson's beliefs. The first one is that Anne believes that everyone has an inner light, or inner beauty. She also believed that the Puritans should not use the Indians as slaves. The last thing that stood out to me is that since Anne was a woman, and women were considered property, she wasn't heard fairly by the judges of the court. My question is, how long did it take to write the script?

Witch Watch period 8/9

I learned from reading some of the Witch Watch newspaper that many people used to think that if women do anything that is not marrying, having babies, or doing housework, they think that the women are working with the devil. I also learned that people thought that it was much easier to accuse women because they were thought to be less competent than men. The last thing that I learned was that even children could get suspected or accused of witchcraft. For example, a four-year-old named Dorcas Good was accused of witchcraft because of a tic mark. My question for the newspaper is, how many people under the age of twenty-one were accused of witchcraft?

Stacy
Period 8/9

7:44 PM  
Anonymous JACK 1 said...

I leared from the newspaper people would be put to trial as a witch if a pimple, mole or wart of any kind. Also I learned that many innocent people on trial for witchcraft said that they were witches because they were being tortured. Lastly I that many people involved with the government were put on trial.

Were Abigail and Elizabeth trying get someone in trouble when they acted up in church? If so, why?


Jack 1
Doyle
Per. 3-4

7:54 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Tiffany
pd.3-4 Doyle
1/07/08
Pd. 8-9 movie and pd. 3-4 newspaper

pd.8-9 movie:
In this movie I learned more about Anne Hutchinson. Originally I did know a few things about Anne Hutchinson and her main life. What I did not know is that she had a lot of kids. So in the movie I discovered she had a lot of kids, her husband was some what pleasant to Anne but he thought that she was a threat to the to the colony. I also learned that Anne Hutchinson and Mary Deyr were close and they met in October. The baby was also dead and deformed when she gave birth. The overall movie was nicely laid out and the bloopers were very entertaining to watch at the end. Question: How exactly did Mary Deyr and Anne Hutchinson meet? I know when they met but where or how did they meet?

Newspaper pd. 3-4
In the Newspaper I learned that the whole Salem Witch hunt hysteria began in February of 1692.I also learned that the Puritans were worried that Indians would attack them, and the war between the English and the French had cut off the Puritans from their resources. The last thing I learned was that the Puritans were also nervous because they each wanted to be in God's elect, and to get a place in heaven.  They were in God’s elect, but the tiniest mistake would send them to the underworld. They had to be perfect.  Because the Puritans were so nervous, it was easy for the idea of the existence of witches to make them frantic.
This newspaper was nice and it had a lot of good articles however I did think the period 8-9 was better organized and somewhat more interesting. But overall it was good and also I did not quite get the comics. Question: I understand that they had to be perfect in order to be god's elect but just by the tiniest mistake how come they got sent to the underworld?

8:01 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The Witch Watch newspaper per. 8-9

One thing I learned about the Salem Witch Trials is that people at the time sometimes used spectral evidence, knowing that it outweighed actual evidence (another thing I learned), in attempt to lying accuse people they did not like of being a witch. They used spectral evidence to get rid of hated people. This is why the General Public would play such a big role on the trials of accused witches. Even if someone was proved innocent, the General Public could easily turn the table by going into painful fits or protesting. Another thing I learned from the nespaper, was that one of the four commonly used methods for determining witches,'swimming witches,' was used because the Puritan people believed that water is pure and that it cannot allow witches to pass through it. That is why if the accused person floated, he/she was a witch. One las and very interesting thing that I learned about the Salem Witch Trials from reading the newspaper, is that in Salem at the time, many of the accused people may have been found guilty and only accused due to "witchlike" behavior caused by ergot fungus growing on the community's rye crop. These crops may have been contaminated with a poisonous fungus that causes behavior affecting neurophermalogical symptoms. These symptoms were very closely related to supposed "witchlike" behavior, and therefore mistaken as witchlike behavior.
Question: Were the methods for determining witches invented and used before the time of the Salem Witch Trials?

Documentary on the trial of Anne Hutchinson per. 8-9

One of the many things I learned from watching the documentary, was that Anne Hutchinson believed that the Puritans were very harsh to other faiths, such as Quakers, and that she believed the Puritans should not use Indians as slaves. Another thing I learned from the documentary, was that Anne Hutchinson's trial was held in October, 1637. I also learned that her maiden name was Marbury--like her father's, she married William Hutchinson in 1612 at the age of 21, and that she died in 1643. One very interesting thing I learned about Anne Hutchinson's trial, was that John Winthrop, a governor of Salem and also the judge of Anne's trial, tried various sneaky ways to get Anne Hutchinson to lose the trial. One of these ways, was that John Winthrop moved the trial to many miles away from Salem, in attempt that maybe Anne Hutchinson would be late to the trial. If she was late, she obviously would not have an argument to state, and would therefore automatically lose the trial. The second the last thing I learned from watching the documentary, was that John Winthrop believed that the church of England was currupt and the people of God must leave a world of unjust rights and receive God's graces on the way to Heaven of Hell. Most of all, the people of God needed a place where their ministers could interpret the word of God for them without the restrictions of the English church. The last thing I learned about Anne Hutchinson's trial from the documentary, is that John Winthrop believed Anne was prejuducial to the state.
Question: Where did Anne Hutchinson go after her banishment from the colony?

-Matthew, per. 3-4

8:02 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

In the newspaper "The Witch Watch" I learned a few key details that i didn't know even though I was in the other newspaper. I did know that the Native American wars had an effect on the trials, but I didn't know what that effect was until now. I also assumed that Giles Corey died when he was being pressed I had no clue that he died two days later. I also didn't know that George Burroughs allegedly made a local army lose a war. I was sadly only able to read though group articles, because the sidebar to the left vanished after I left the page and tried to go back.
Questions: 1. Are some of the dates that the articles were said to have been written right, because one sounded like it was at the end of the trials but the date was July 19, 1692?
2. What did Judge Samuel Sewall say in his apology?
I learned from the period 3-4 video that while Ann Hutchinson was banished another women, Mary Dira was killed for speaking out. I also didn't know that John Winthrop went to Cambridge I thought that was interesting. Finally I learned that the reason the put Ann Hutchinson on trials was because she was a women with power.
Questions: 1. Did every group make a small video and then they put them together into a big video?
2. Where did they film the chase seen at the end?
-Logan
Ms. Doyle 3-4

8:05 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Anne Hutchinson Movie 8/9

I learned that Roger Williams supported Anne Hutchinson and was tolerant of Quakers. I also learned that she had great belief in her god and was very determined to spread her views on religion. John Winthrop was very mad at Hutchinson, partly just for her being a woman and having power, and questioning authority. My question for the movie is was Anne Hutchinson treated differently then other people on trial?

WitchWatch Newspaper 8/9

One thing I learned is that one of the most probable causes of the Salem Witch Trials is Ergot fungus. It got onto the peoples corn, and possibly made them hallucinate and think people were performing witchcraft. I also learned that women were accused more then men (80% of accused were women, 85% of executed are woman). Children had a great part in the trials. Two girls started the whole thing. My question for the newspaper is if women and children were so unimportant, how did two little girls start the Salem Witch Trials?

Cole
Doyle Per 3/4

8:17 PM  
Blogger Kassim said...

The Salem Witch Trials newspaper was very informative and well written. I was amazed by how awful the hysteria was during the Salem Witch Trials. It came to a point where anything could be looked at as witchcraft and any person could accuse anyone they pleased. It was a sad time in American history because it showed how gullible and self-righteous the Puritans were in desperate times. Also the mistreatment of orphans was sad and it showed how hard it was to move from social class to social class. In a way it is comparable to the Aryan caste system where you are born in a caste, you stay in that caste unless good karma moved you up in your next life.
The period 3-4 documentary was very well acted and well put together. each scene showed behind the scenes of the Anne Hutchinson trial and added an extra twist. The Saul Levmore interview was very well done and very informative. It told me all the errors of the trial and also how corrupt the trial became. The court scene was very well played out and showed how the individuals in the jury and the judge responded with very bias views due to the fact that the judge was against her. But the individuals who stood up for Hutchinson resembled how close the trial was.

9:08 PM  
Anonymous Marissa said...

I watched the movie from period 8-9 and looked at the newspaper from period 3-4.

From the Anne Hutchinson documentary, I learned that Anne Hutchinson's maiden name was Marbury. I also learned that she was baptized on July 20th, 1591, and that she had 15 children. I would like to know- Did the students purposefully try to mix present day things (such as the Oprah Winfrey show and Anne Hutchinson being long gone) with stuff from the past (such as her trials and interviews with John Winthrop)? Because I was a little confused on whether this was all supposed to take place in the past or present day. It seemed like it switched between the two frequently, and I just wanted to know why the students chose to do that.

From the newspaper, I learned that although may people questioned spectral evidence, no one ever did anything about it until 1693. I learned that women of color were treated extremely poorly in the time of the Salem Witch Trials, and also that witchcraft was practiced in ancient Europe way before the Salem Witch Trials, and that it was frowned upon just like it was in Salem. A question I would ask the group- Who exactly was Cotton Mather? Like, when did he die? When was he born? Who was his family? I would like to learn more about Cotton Mather.

9:17 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

For the Salem Witch trials newspaper I read the article called Screaming Child in Chains from period 8-9. It was very interesting I learned a lot from it. This article that I read was focused on Dorcas, daughter of Sarah Dorcas. Dorcas had been accused of being a witch because she had a "devils' mark" on her forehead which was probably a tick bite. She actually had confessed to being a witch so she could be with her mother, and it worked. Sarah had no love for Dorcas anymore because she was still depressed about a newborn baby she had lost. I have one question: Was this a hard topic to research?
I had viewed the period 8-9 Anne Hutchinson documentary. I really liked it and it was full of many facts. Now I know a lot more about Anne Hutchinson. She had believed that the natives should have their own rights. Apparently she had been “disturbing the peace” because of her private meetings and her own beliefs. Though she did very well in her trial, she did not have any proof for anything that she said, like she thought that everyone had an innerlite and God was guiding her… she had no proof!
Mckenzie Ms. Doyle per 8-9

10:35 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The 6-8 Video
I learned from the movie that Anne was popular and non-popular to alot of people and the movie was well put together and entertaining.

The 6-8 Newspaper
The Newspaper was very well put together
and I learned alot about Tituba that I did not know and over all a good resource for information.
Fiona Potter
3-4
Ms. Doyle

9:07 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Period 8-9 Documentary of the Trial of Ann Hutchinson

From this video I learned that Ann Hutchinson believes everyone has an inner light and everyone can communitcate with God. But people started thinking of her as a threat to their community. So she had a trial in October of 1637 when she was 43 and pregnant.


Period 8-9 The Witch Watch. Abigail and Elizabeth: The Girls That Started the Carze

From this artical I learned that Abigail Williams and Elizabeth Parris became the witch finders of Salem. But when the girls started to crawl on the floor barking like dogs, people started to believe that the devil was at work. This only happend when the girls believed Tibuta could communicate with the dead.

-Ruby
Doyle 8-9
<3

10:59 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I decided to read the front page of the ¾ period newspaper. I learned about how the witch hysteria in Salem all started. It was sad that Abigail Williams and Elizabeth Parris accused random helpless people in the town. Governor John Winthrop even commissioned a court called Oyer and Terminer for all witch trials. I found it unfair to all those accused, and all those killed innocently. I hope we can use this as an example before we blame others around us. I thought overall, it was well written.


Vicky
Period 8-9

11:32 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Doyle 8-9
Aurielle

I watched per. 3-4 documentary and learned that John Winthrop went to a very good school in England by the name of Cambridge. I also learned that Anne was pregnant during her trial.
I wonder if Anne Hutchinson really did the right thing?

For the news paper i looked at per. 3-4, and learned how the Salem Which Trials were a very harsh time for the Puritan people and also that George Burroughs was accused of witch craft.
Were the Salem Trials fair?

11:36 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I learned that 24 people were accused and then killed for being followers. i Thought that this was very disturbing and interesting at the same time. It was also strange that the governor could go around town and say someone was a witch just because they felt like it. I also learned that over 100 people were accused of being in witches in 1692. It think that it is very shocking that one hundred people were accused in one year, even though there was no proof of them being witches.


My questions are for "Accusations in the Salem Witch Trials" and the the video from period 8-9. my first question is, "What was jail like for Puritans?" my second question was, "Why did you, (the people who made the film), make the movie like a news brodcast?"

Nell period 8-9

12:00 PM  
Blogger Alden said...

I learned several interesting facts about the Salem trials and about Anne Hutchinson herself. Many people could be convicted of being witches, including men. Most targets were social rejects, people who didn't go to church, and people in the wrong place at the wrong time. What i mean by wrong place at the wrong time is that if someone gave a cow a dirty look and then the cow suddenly didn't produce as much milk the man could be convicted. Also from the paper I learned that not just holy water is a pure object; plain water is a pure object. They thought that a pure object would reject an impure person (witches), thats why they did the water test. The last fact i learned from the newspaper was that they tortured many people to get confessions that they were indeed witches.

I watched the 8-9 period documentary i was surprised by a few things. First, Anne Hutchinson did not disagree with the ministers or their sermons but she believed that the people were misunderstanding them. I knew that many women were considered to be lower than the men in the family. But what I didn't know was that Anne's Husband thought of her as an equal because they grew up as childhood friends. The last thing i learned was that the first day of the trial, it was stopped early because the judge wanted to allow Anne to consider her choices about conceding or continuing to try to prove her innocence.

Ms. Doyle 8-9
Alden

7:52 PM  
Blogger Phil said...

I looked at The Purifier (Period 3-4’s newspaper.) One thing that I learned was that around 500 A.D., practicing Christianity was reserved for those of higher social status. I also learned that Reverend Parris first met Tituba in Barbados and not in the U.S. A third thing that I learned was that a girl named Anne Putnam Jr. actually apologized for her actions after all was said and done.
One question that I have is: How many men were accused of practicing witchcraft during the Salem witch Trials?

I watched period 8-9’s video. One thing that I learned was that Anne Hutchinson actually had a relatively pleasant childhood. I also learned that John Winthrop was born in 1588. A third thing that I learned was that Anne Hutchinson’s trial was held in the October of 1637.
One question that I have is: How long did Anne Hutchinson’s trial take?

Phil
Ms. Doyle
Period 8-9

8:12 PM  
Blogger Phil said...

I looked at The Purifier (Period 3-4’s newspaper.) One thing that I learned was that around 500 A.D., practicing Christianity was reserved for those of higher social status. I also learned that Reverend Parris first met Tituba in Barbados and not in the U.S. A third thing that I learned was that a girl named Anne Putnam Jr. actually apologized for her actions after all was said and done.
One question that I have is: How many men were accused of practicing witchcraft during the Salem witch Trials?

I watched period 8-9’s video. One thing that I learned was that Anne Hutchinson actually had a relatively pleasant childhood. I also learned that John Winthrop was born in 1588. A third thing that I learned was that Anne Hutchinson’s trial was held in the October of 1637.
One question that I have is: How long did Anne Hutchinson’s trial take?

Phil
Ms. Doyle
Period 8-9

8:12 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I learned that Tituba was the woman who practilly started this whole witch hunt. She was the cause of the girls acting weird. I also learned that a man named john proctor was the first man accused of being a witch. I also learned that Ann hutchinson wanted natives rights to keep there land. And she fought for them too. One interesting thing i learned from the newspaper was that the court used spectral evidence. Spectral evidence is when an accused witch accuses other people of tormenting him or her. From the movie i learned that after Ann Hutchinson was banished from the Plimith colony she went to Rhode Island then New York then she lost her life after a couple of years.

My question for the newspaper is, Did using spectral evidence really work? And did the witch cake work at all? For the video my question is, Why did the puritans think it was bad to fight for the natives?
Sam 1
Doyle
Period 3-4

6:27 AM  

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